Metaloglass

I ran across an interesting piece of history while doing some research on molecular models.  From the business section of the November 2nd, 1961, edition of Jet magazine...

A Boston firm, Metaloglass, Inc., turned down an order from Limestone College in South Carolina because of its ‘segregationist policy,’ said Dr. Alexander S. Szagedy, a Hungarian refugee who heads the firm. He wrote the college that although Metaloglass was a ‘very small, new outfit’ which needed business badly, he would not do business with a Jim Crow institution. ‘I...experienced both Nazi and Communist dictatorships, where the common basis was hate, the same hate on which is based your segregationist policy,’ he added.”

I wasn't able to find much else on Metaloglass or Dr. Szagedy, but a collector has posted some photos of his ball-and-stick crystal structure models.  They had plastic (phenolic resin?) balls and featured some interestingly sparse rods (steel).

Cesium Chloride (Metaloglass)

Cesium Chloride (Metaloglass)

Sodium Chloride (Metaloglass)

Sodium Chloride (Metaloglass)

Diamond (Metaloglass)

Diamond (Metaloglass)

Magnesium (Metaloglass)

Magnesium (Metaloglass)

Cementite (Metaloglass)

Cementite (Metaloglass)

An antiques dealer also had posted a collagen model built by Metaloglass, which looks absolutely beautiful.

Collagen segment (Metaloglass)

Collagen segment (Metaloglass)

It's good to remember that what usually remains after we're gone is the work we've done and the stands we've made.